Company Name

Welcome to Maxim Physical Therapy!
 
We are your local source for Physical Therapy, Aquatic Therapy, Exercise, Fitness and Sports Medicine.Click here to edit subtitle

Trainers corner

view:  full / summary

What is Kinesio Tape?

Posted on April 29, 2019 at 4:05 PM Comments comments (2)

There has been much attention given lately to the importance of muscle function and to the idea of treating the muscles as a means of activating the body's own healing process. It was discovered that muscles and other tissues could be helped though external support, such as the use of an elastic tape. Application of Kinesio Tape creates an innovative approach to treating nerves, muscles, and organs. Certified Kinesio Tape Practitioners can most accurately and efficiently assess and treat by encouraging the body’s natural healing processes. Kinesio Tape can reduce the need for medication to assist with tissue healing and management of the pain cycle.

Kinesio Taping is a technique based on the body's own natural healing process that offers a gentle and effective approach. Kinesio Tape can be used in the re-education of the neuromuscular system, improvement of circulation, assistance with pain relief, and providing support and stability. Muscles not only command the movements of the body, but also control the circulation of blood and lymph fluids. With irritation to a muscle group, the space between the skin and muscle is compressed which results in constriction of lymphatic fluid flow and pressure to pain receptors beneath the skin. Compression of these receptors will communicate "discomfort signals" to the brain, which the person experiences as PAIN. Conventional athletic tape is designed to restrict the movement and compress affected muscles and joints. As mentioned, this pressure will result in the obstruction of the flow of bodily fluids...an undesirable side-effect. On the other hand, Kinesio Taping is based on a different philosophy that aims to give free range of motion in order to allow the body's muscular system to heal itself.

Kinesio Taping gives support and stability to your joints and muscles without limiting circulation or range of motion. It is also used for preventive maintenance, edema control, and pain management within the joint. Kinesio Taping can benefit beyond conventional taping techniques, without many of the drawbacks seen with these same techniques. It is these benefits that have drawn athletes to seek the assistance of Certified Kinesio Tape Practitioners.

The Kinesio Taping method requires a tape that is skin friendly, possesses optimum elastic qualities, is the same thickness as the skin, is durable enough to stay on multiple days even through sweat and showers, and offers support 24 hours a day. Kinesio Tape is made of latex-free, hypoallergenic materials that can be used with almost all skin types. Kinesio Tape has many applications that include but are not limited to: Carpal tunnel syndrome, shoulder impingment, lower back strain/pain, hamstring and groin injury, rotator cuff injury, whiplash, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, patella tracking, pre and post-surgical edema, ankle sprains, athletic preventative injury, and as a joint support.

For questions and treatment options, feel free to contact our Certified Kinesio Tape Practitioner here at Maxim Physical Therapy

By:

Traci Baseley PTA, CKTP

Don't forget

Posted on March 14, 2019 at 12:35 AM Comments comments (1)

Sport Medicine:


Maxim Physical Therapy is committed to the Health and Well-being of all of our local Student Athletes

We currently provide a Sports Medicine Training room on-site at Shasta High School & Enterprise High School. Call our clinic or check with your athletic director to confirm hours!!!


WINTER IS COMING

Posted on November 16, 2018 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)
Dark, cold mornings can make getting out of bed even harder than it already is. While it becomes easier to hit snooze when the weather is not agreeing with you, it is important to get out of bed on time regardless of how chilly your home may have gotten over night. Our mornings set the stage for our whole day, so we shouldn???t just snooze them away. Set a Soothing Alarm An alarm clock, or more likely your cell phone alarm, is a necessary evil for waking up in the morning. Many people choose to wake up to the classic *eeeh oooh eeeh ooh* alarm hoping the loud annoying sound will jolt their bodies awake. According to an article by MindBodyGreen, classic alarm tones do just that, rush your body to wake up rather than letting it happen at a natural pace. The loud scary alarm tone can make your brain release adrenaline, the fight or flight hormone. Adrenaline increases your heart rate and can make you feel stressed, leaving you frazzled for your morning. Sleep doctors recommend waking up to the following melodic tones: 1.) Ripples 2.) Harp Take A Hot Shower Taking a hot shower in the morning will: 1.) increase blood circulation, warming you up for the rest of the day. 2.) Decrease potential stress, and anxiety about all of the tasks you have to complete in your day. 3) Feel amazing To trap all of the heat generated in your body during your shower, dry off and get dressed right away. Walking around with wet hair could put you back to square one of coldness. Make a Warm Breakfast Your first meal of the day should gently invite your body to wake up and start running again, and a warm breakfast will do just that! Eating a warm breakfast will help keep your insides up to body temp. When you eat a cold breakfast, your body works over time to heat your intestines and stomach back up. So if indulge in a nice warm cup of oatmeal, your body can spend energy heating up the rest of your body rather than your stomach. . Pick out your Clothes the Night Before Picking out your outfit the night before can save you time and energy in the morning, aka more time to stay under the covers. Turn your Thermostat Up: It may cost you a little bit more money each month, but your happiness will be worth it. Research recommends an indoor temp of 72 degrees during the winter. Winter is going to continue to forge on, likely for several months. Hopefully these tips will help you stay warm and productive in the morning this season.

The silent danger behind high school sports.

Posted on August 28, 2018 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

In high school sports, our student athletes face many dangers. Broken bones, sprained ankles and occasional cuts are just a few that come to mind.One of the most dangerous encounters a high school football player may face is not the 250-pound opposing team’s linebacker, but a microscopic organism that you can’t see or hear … most would think differently. However, statistics show a growing number of MRSA (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus) infections among high school athletes; primarily the football turf and volleyball/basketball court.MRSA is a bacteria sometimes referred to as a “superbug” that is responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. Bacterial infections are routinely treated with an antibiotic. The problem with MRSA is that it is resistant or doesn’t respond to most antibiotics and continues to spread.MRSA initially shows up as small, red bumps that may resemble a spider bite, a pimple or boil and can be accompanied by fever and rash. The majority of MRSA infections affecting young healthy athletes are localized to skin and soft tissue. However, there is a possibility that the infection could enter the bloodstream, resulting in sepsis and affecting vital organs and ultimately death.Many MRSA skin and soft tissue infections require a surgical “washout” of the abscess along with appropriate antibiotics. The problem as noted previously, is that some MRSA infections don’t respond to traditional or “high-powered antibiotics.”In the United States, an increasing number of MRSA outbreaks are occurring in locker rooms, gyms and on the field of play. In these outbreaks, shared clothing, sports equipment, towels, balms, lubricants, razors and soaps, improper care of skin trauma and direct skin-to-skin contact with MRSA lesions are all identified as risk factors for getting MRSA.A study in the New England Journal of Medicine linked MRSA to abrasions caused by artificial turf. Three studies by the Texas State Department of Health found that the infection rate among football players was 16 times the national average. In 1974, MRSA infections accounted for 2% of the total number of staph infections, in 1995 it was 22%, and by 2004, it rose to 63%.Athletes with mild cases of MRSA infections may be allowed to return to athletics once an appropriate and effective antibiotic treatment has begun and the risk of transmission to other athletes has been significantly reduced or eliminated.Abrasions should be covered and the athlete should be re-evaluated daily for signs or symptoms of recurrence or worsening of the infection. Alcohol has been proven to be an effective surface sanitizer against MRSA.Just like with antibiotics, MRSA is acquiring more resistance to some disinfectants and antiseptics. A more effective strategy is to wash hands with running water and anti-microbial cleanser with persistent killing action, such as chlorhexidine.A report concluded that poor hygiene habits remained the principle barrier to significant reductions in the spread of MRSA. Educate you high school athlete on the importance of keeping abrasions covered and clean, don't share personal equiptment and report any concerning skin discolorations.


Cyclist Palsy...

Posted on May 9, 2018 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (23)


Handlebar Palsy – AKA Cyclist’s Palsy




Numb hands can ruin a ride, both because of the discomfort and the lack of control. A common and preventable cause of numb hands is cyclist’s palsy, also commonly known as handlebar palsy. It is the result of too much pressure on the ulnar or median nerve where they enter the hand from the wrist. Knowing its cause will send you on your way to finding solutions that work for your own handlebar palsy.

Where Hand Meets Handlebarulnar nerve

The ulnar nerve enters the hand at the wrist at the heel of the palm opposite the thumb. That pad on the heel is often where the hand rests on the handlebar. Inside that pad is the ulnar nerve, running through the Guyon canal and compressed by the bones of the wrist and hand. Enough pressure, and your pinky and ring finger go numb. More than enough pressure can lead to a fully numb hand. 

The median nerve enters the hand at the wrist between the ulnar nerve and the base of the thumb through the carpal tunnel. Too much pressure here and you will feel your index and middle fingers go numb. The numbness can occur in conjunction with ulnar nerve numbness.

Solutions to Handlebar Palsy

Ensuring your hands contact your bars at an angle that allows your wrist to lay naturally is ideal. Any hyperextension of the wrist puts additional pressure on the nerves entering your hands. Resting your hands on the handlebar with as little bend as possible at the wrist lets the nerves lay unimpeded into your palms.


Changing positions on your handlebars during the course of a ride can alleviate symptoms of handlebar palsy. On a road bike with drop bars, if you feel numbness coming on, move to a different position that takes pressure off of the heel of your palm. On a flat bar bike it is a bit more difficult because there are more limited positions. If you often have handlebar palsy and frequently ride a flat bar bike, consider adding bar ends for an additional position. Remember to position them correctly. Perpendicular to the ground is not correct; The should face forward at an angle that allows your wrists to rest naturally.

Padding your hands will also help relieve handlebar palsy. This can either be done with padded bar, doubled up bar tape, gel pads under the bar or padded gloves. Try gloves on first to make sure they fit comfortably; too loose and they will cause blisters, too tight and they can cause even more numbness. Some overly padded gloves can also cause numbness by concentrating pressure on extra large pads.

Moving your saddle down and back can also relieve pressure on your hands. Beware that other positional problems may arise if you go this route. Whatever changes you make, do them incrementally. 

If these solutions do not work, seek out a bike fit expert to examine your position. Additionally, you may want to seek out a health professional to determine exactly what is happening in your nerves. They can give you exercises to relieve abused nerves.

The Nerve

Understanding the nerves that cause handlebar palsy will give you a better idea of what causes it and how you can fix it. These simple fixes are effective and easy to try out. If the problem persists, go to a professional for an objective and knowledgeable view so you can keep riding in complete control.

Are you Ready?

Posted on January 9, 2018 at 1:40 PM Comments comments (2)


 While there may not be enough white stuff to shred just yet, we know that it is coming! Are you ready?! Some of the most-common injuries we encounter through the winter are skiing/snowboarding related. Fortunately, many of these injuries can be avoided with the proper strengthening in key muscle groups of your legs, hips, and core. We at Maxim Physical Therapy are ready to share some of the best exercises you can do to get ready for the upcoming ski/snowboard season. Get started right now to ensure an entire season of fun, healthy shredding!


(Google the following exercise for great instructional videos)

Box Jump Squat (sets of 10)

Explosive leg power and dynamic knee control in one! Come all the way up to standing on top of the box.

Russian Twists (sets of 10 touches to each side)

Rotating core control is vital for skiers and snowboarders alike. Russian twists work not only the anterior muscles, but the obliques/sides as well!

Alternating Jump Lunges (sets of 10 lunges on each leg)

Great to work on independent leg control. Try to keep your knee in line with your toe.

Single Leg Deadlift (sets of 10 on each leg)

Keep the butt strong and the back healthy with this one!

Wall Sit (hold at least 30 seconds; aim to go for as long as you can)

An essential exercise for lower body endurance! Make your last run as great as the first with this great exercise!

Bicycle Crunches (sets of 10-15 touches on each side)

Reciprocal muscle activation is a great way to elevate your results – bicycle crunches are a great way to increase muscle strength and core stability!

Mountain Climbers (20 touches on each side)

Keep your core tight while working on strength and endurance.

These exercises are essential for training and strengthening all the key muscles used in skiing/snowboarding. Try doing them regularly to not only get ready for the season, but to ensue you stay healthy and strong through the whole season! Do you have an old ski injury that’s still bothering you? Looking for more advice and exercises to get in shape this season? We would love to help you out! Contact us at one of our convenient locations to see what we can do to make sure you have a fun and safe ski season.

Most common sports related injuries

Posted on October 31, 2017 at 1:35 PM Comments comments (4)

The silent danger behind high school sports.

Posted on October 10, 2017 at 2:45 PM Comments comments (1)


In high school sports, our student athletes face many dangers. Broken bones, sprained ankles and occasional cuts are just a few that come to mind.

One of the most dangerous encounters a high school football player may face is not the 250-pound opposing team’s linebacker, but a microscopic organism that you can’t see or hear … most would think differently. However, statistics show a growing number of MRSA (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus) infections among high school athletes; primarily the football turf and volleyball/basketball court.

MRSA is a bacteria sometimes referred to as a “superbug” that is responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. Bacterial infections are routinely treated with an antibiotic. The problem with MRSA is that it is resistant or doesn’t respond to most antibiotics and continues to spread.

MRSA initially shows up as small, red bumps that may resemble a spider bite, a pimple or boil and can be accompanied by fever and rash. The majority of MRSA infections affecting young healthy athletes are localized to skin and soft tissue. However, there is a possibility that the infection could enter the bloodstream, resulting in sepsis and affecting vital organs and ultimately death.

Many MRSA skin and soft tissue infections require a surgical “washout” of the abscess along with appropriate antibiotics. The problem as noted previously, is that some MRSA infections don’t respond to traditional or “high-powered antibiotics.”

In the United States, an increasing number of MRSA outbreaks are occurring in locker rooms, gyms and on the field of play. In these outbreaks, shared clothing, sports equipment, towels, balms, lubricants, razors and soaps, improper care of skin trauma and direct skin-to-skin contact with MRSA lesions are all identified as risk factors for getting MRSA.

A study in the New England Journal of Medicine linked MRSA to abrasions caused by artificial turf. Three studies by the Texas State Department of Health found that the infection rate among football players was 16 times the national average. In 1974, MRSA infections accounted for 2% of the total number of staph infections, in 1995 it was 22%, and by 2004, it rose to 63%.

Athletes with mild cases of MRSA infections may be allowed to return to athletics once an appropriate and effective antibiotic treatment has begun and the risk of transmission to other athletes has been significantly reduced or eliminated.

Abrasions should be covered and the athlete should be re-evaluated daily for signs or symptoms of recurrence or worsening of the infection. Alcohol has been proven to be an effective surface sanitizer against MRSA.

Just like with antibiotics, MRSA is acquiring more resistance to some disinfectants and antiseptics. A more effective strategy is to wash hands with running water and anti-microbial cleanser with persistent killing action, such as chlorhexidine.

A report concluded that poor hygiene habits remained the principle barrier to significant reductions in the spread of MRSA. Educate you high school athlete on the importance of keeping abrasions covered and clean, don't share personal equiptment and report any concerning skin discolorations.


Flip Flops?

Posted on May 31, 2017 at 4:40 PM Comments comments (3)

Summer exercise safety tips

Posted on May 31, 2017 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (6)

Blazing sun, rising humidity, soaring temperatures -- these might be the perfect conditions for a beach day, but they’re definitely not ideal for outdoor exercise. So, what should you do? Don your bathing suit and head down for the beach instead of your training session? Although that may be more desirable option, you can’t avoid exercise all summer!


Avoid exercising during the hottest parts of the day. Do your best to avoid outdoor exercise between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. – those hours tend to be the hottest parts of the day, so it’s best to try exercising in the morning or evening instead.

Protect yourself against the sun. Sunburn can mess with the body’s ability to regulate temperature, so be sure to use a broad spectrum sunscreen before and during exercise to protect yourself.

Rest in shaded places. Don’t be afraid to take a break during physical activity in the intense heat. Find a shaded place and attempt to cool down while staying shielded from the sun.

Eat properly. Your body needs fuel to perform its best. Avoid running on a totally empty stomach; it’s imperative that your body has some calories to burn while exercising.

Hydrate! It’s important to get enough fluids before, during, and after a workout. If you sweat, then you know it’s time to replenish.

So, the question is – water or sports drink? Studies suggests that the majority of your hydration should come from water, but sports drinks are okay in moderation. If you do want a sports drink, try mixing half water and half sports drink to cut down on the sugar while still replenishing electrolytes.

It doesn’t take long for your body to heat up. Many times, people assume that if they’re only outside for a short period of time, the body won’t overheat. However, that’s not always the case. Thirty minutes is still enough time for your body to overheat, so be cognizant of what time and how long you’re exercising.

Choose the right clothing. Choosing clothes that “breathes,” such as mesh material. Cotton doesn’t allow you to perspire and will cause your body to overheat, so choose breathable materials instead (including socks).

Follow these summer tips to embrace warm weather exercise without compromising our health. 



Rss_feed